Getting Ready For The KS2 Reading Test

Updated: Nov 23, 2021




If you're here for the resources, then here are the links:


Booklet 1: https://www.aidansevers.com/product-page/booklet-1-year-6-sats-prep-reading-comprehension-questions-mark-scheme


Booklet 2: https://www.aidansevers.com/product-page/booklet-2-year-6-sats-prep-reading-comprehension-questions-mark-scheme


However, if you have a little more time, have a read about the thought process that has gone into the resource creation.


But, before you start reading my bit, I can't stress how important it is that you read Penny Slater's blog series of reflections on analysis of the 2019 reading test (which is the last SATs reading test that we have). It is in 4 parts and it has been the reading of these that has brought me to write this blog post about how I am hoping to prepare for future tests:


https://www.hertsforlearning.co.uk/blog/reflections-analysis-2019-ks2-reading-sats-part-1


https://www.hertsforlearning.co.uk/blog/reflections-analysis-2019-ks2-reading-sats-part-2


https://www.hertsforlearning.co.uk/blog/reflections-analysis-2019-ks2-reading-sats-part-3


https://www.hertsforlearning.co.uk/blog/reflections-analysis-2019-ks2-reading-sats-part-4


One of our main reflections on having given our year 6 children a go at some of the past papers is that stamina is a key skill which needs to be developed. And whilst this isn't the only thing we do in the run-up to SATS - we will still be reading a class novel, doing Reciprocal Reading, Fluency Reads and so on - we think it is important that the children gain experience of test-style questions, layout, conditions and so on.


With this in mind, I looked at the wordage breakdowns that Tim Roach and Penny Slater provided:


Given that 2019's test had the longest reading extracts ever I decided to use its word count as a benchmark for developing some reading comprehension activities that we could use with the children to develop their stamina.

It wasn't just the word count that was the issue. Previously, we had no way of checking whether or not the reading materials we were using in reading lessons were of a comparable difficulty to the texts used in the tests.

I used a simple online analysis tool to get some more information: https://datayze.com/readability-analyzer.php


I ran each of the three 2019 reading texts through the tool and got the following information:


The Park:

Fact Sheet: About Bumblebees:

Music Box:


Using this data I set about finding similar suitable texts (in both length and readability) to use for a series of test-like comprehension activities. The aim of these activities is to replicate the length and readability of the second and third texts in the 2019 paper so as to provide around 40-45 minutes' worth of reading and answering questions. So far, at my current school, reading lessons have not provided such practice at such length so in the run up to Easter we have adapted our timetable to allow for longer reading lessons.


To aid me in the creation of these questions I re-made the questions from texts 2 and 3 of the 2019 paper and used these as a template.

I also did a quick analysis of both question types (e.g. short written answer, complete the table, multiple choice tick box etc) and an analysis of the content domain coverage (using the information in the mark scheme):


Fact Sheet: All About Bumblebees:


Content Domains:


2a = 2/19 marks = 11%

2b = 9/19 marks = 47% (2 mark questions)

2c = 6/19 marks = 32%

2d = 3/19 marks = 16% (inferences in NF)

2g = 1/19 marks = 5%


Question types:

Short answer (one line): 14, 17, 18, 21, 26 = 5/15 = 33%

Medium answer (two lines): 19, 22b, 27 = 3/15 = 20%

Complete table: 15, 25 = 2/15 = 13%

Multiple choice tick box: 16, 20, 23 = 3/15 = 20%

Tick table: 22a, 24 = 2/15 = 13%


Music Box:


Content Domains:


2a = 1/17 marks = 6%

2b = 5/17 marks = 29%

2d = 9/17 marks = 53% (3 mark inference questions)

2g = 2/17 marks = 12%


Question types:


Short answer (one line): 31, 34, 35, 36, 38 = 5/12 = 42%

Medium answer (two lines): 28, 30 = 2/12 = 17%

Long answer (3 marks): 39 (32 is also 3 marks) = 1/12 = 8%

Complete table: 32, 33 = 2/12 = 17%

Multiple choice tick box: 29, 37 = 2/12 = 17%


So far I have identified several texts which I have begun to create reading comprehension questions for. With the ones I have created so far I have stuck quite closely to the questions from the 2019 test, however will probably deviate more to bring in more variety as I create more resources.


Here are the texts I have found so far (texts in bold are texts from 2019 test):


Most texts have been sourced from Nat Geo Kids and LoveReading4Kids.


A note on the Flesch score: The Flesch score uses the number of syllables and sentence lengths to determine the reading ease of the sample. A Flesch score of 60 is taken to be plain English. A score in the range of 60-70 corresponds to 8th/9th grade English level. A score between 50 and 60 corresponds to a 10th/12th grade level. Below 30 is college graduate level. To give you a feel for what the different levels are like, most states require scores from 40 to 50 for insurance documents.


So, looking at the above non-fiction texts, and converting the US grade system to the UK year group system we find that, according to this simple analysis, All About Bumblebees could potentially be a year 9/10 level text, better suited to 13-15 year-olds. However, the Flesch Reading Ease scores are calculated using only number of words, number of sentences and number of syllables in words.

In order to get another idea of readability I also averaged out the scores from the 5 other readability scores that the analyser provides (Gunning Fog Scale Level, Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level, SMOG Grade, Dale-Chall Score, Fry Readability Grade Level). None of this is an exact science but I hope it gives a ballpark idea of how difficult the texts should be in order to match the texts in the test.

Interestingly, although the text The Park is shorter, and is in the number one position in the 2019 test, it comes out as being a slightly more difficult text than Music Box. In this instance, we must assume the shortness of the text, combined with simpler questions (a heavier focus on retrieval than inference, for example), makes this an easier part of the test. I think it also shows us that the difficulty of the text based on these scores can vary, therefore the questions we ask must be complex enough (if we are wanting to replicate the difficulty of the test for practice purposes). When choosing the non-fiction texts I tried to find things that of a similar interest level to the SATS texts - I also wanted to make sure that there was a variety of subject matter and text type. When choosing the fiction texts I tried to find extracts in which something happens - it wasn't just a case of finding a chunk with the right wordage.


With all this in mind, I suggest the following order of use for these resources:

Booklet 1:


Lightning Mary + Human Digestive System = 495 + 870 = 1365 words

Pets in Cold Weather + Jane Eyre = 650 + 807 = 1457 words

When You Grow Up + The Wrong Train = 700 + 800 = 1500 words

Henry 8th Wives + Armistice Runner = 748 + 774 = 1522 words


Booklet 2:


All About The Circular Economy + Louisiana’s Way Home = 814 + 803 = 1617 words

Dr Jane Goodall Interview + The City of Secret Rivers = 789 + 789 = 1578 words

What is a Bushfire? + Floodworld = 657 + 896 = 1553 words

Tutankhamun + The Girl Who Fell From The Sky = 649 + 908 = 1557 words






If you would like Aidan to work with you on developing reading at your school, please use the contact details below or complete the contact form by clicking on the 'contact' link above.




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